.Most of us had an idea in our head about how breastfeeding would go. You probably pictured the serene moments gazing into each other’s eyes, then your milk drunk baby slipping off to sleep in your arms.  The reality of the early days of breastfeeding can be surprising, as those of us that have lived them can attest. For 80-90% of moms, nipple and breast pain is part of their new mom life, at least in the short term since almost all nipple pain resolves in the first 2 weeks.

Nipple pain it’s not just for new moms, it can re-emerge with each baby. Issues like a shallow latch, slow let-down and tongue tie are unique to each baby. Although your breastfeeding experience will help you solve these problems much faster the second time around.

If you are suffering from nipple pain, here is a list of possible reasons and solutions:

-Shallow latch. You baby should have a wide open mouth before latching onto the nipple and surrounding areola, not just the nipple. Top and bottom lips should both be curled back and the chin firmly pressed on the breast. This position allows the nose to remain unobstructed with correct positioning.

– Pulling your baby off before breaking suction. When you are ready to take your baby off the breast, place a finger in the side of the mouth to release the suction first. Otherwise you stretch and strain tender nipple tissue.

-Slow milk flow. Your baby may be spending extra time on your breast or try to suck with greater force if your let-down reflex takes a while. To speed it up, self express a bit of milk before feeding to get milk flowing and soften up your breast before latching your baby. Once your baby is on the breast, use breast compression to keep milk flowing quickly without much suction from your baby.

-Using the same breastfeeding position every time. Depending on the angle, you baby’s mouth can apply pressure in different parts of your breast and nipple. If you have a tender spot when using the football hold, try lying on your side next time you feed.

-Dry, cracked nipple tissue. Your nipple has natural lubrication from the oils released by your Montgomery Glands, the little bumps that surround your areola. But the friction of your baby’s mouth can strip away your natural oils leaving your nipples red and cracked. There are several nipple creams available that can help your tender tissue heal. Check out our Milkies Nipple Nurture Balm  for an organic olive oil based cream that doesn’t need to be removed prior to putting your baby to breast.

Your nipple pain should taper off and go away entirely by day 14. If your nipple pain lasts longer or is accompanied by other breastfeeding problems like full breasts or a frequently fussy baby, see your lactation consultant.